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Edward Lucarini's blog

Harch HBOT for Infant Problems with the Brain or Brain Trauma: Shaken Baby Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy CP, Infant Brain Injury

HBOT for an Infant/Child Brain Injury

According to Dr. Harch, "HBOT for infants is no different than HBOT for adults except that infants can be exquisitely sensitive to oxygen and thus, require careful dosing." In the early 1990s Dr. Harch began an investigation of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in pediatric brain injury.  Beginning with the first cerebral palsy (CP) child he applied HBOT and SPECT brain blood flow imaging (discussed below) to any child with a neurological diagnosis primarily involving the brain. What he found was that HBOT acted like a generic drug on a multitude of different brain disorders in children, including genetic disorders.

Angiogenesis: The Key to Harch HBOT Healing of a Wound

 

Angiogenesis: The Key to Hyperbaric Oxygen HBOT Therapy

by Paul Harch, M.D.

 

Researchers continue to document an increasing number of acute and chronic drug effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT).  Acutely, HBOT corrects hypoxia [oxygen deprived], reduces edema, augments WBC-mediated bacterial killing, inhibits an aerobic bacteria, and profoundly decreases reperfusion injury. In chronic wounding HBOT induced effects are trophic: fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, epithelialization, and angiogenesis. The latter process is the basis for HBOT generated wound healing and the topic of this HBO on the Avenue.  

ANGIOGENESIS, or new blood vessel growth, is critical to wound healing. In normal wound management with minimal tissue destruction angiogenesis occurs without problems at the wound edge where a steep oxygen gradient exists. The stimulus for angiogenesis is hypoxia at the wound edge that causes various growth factors to be released from wound macrophages. This same hypoxia is responsible for retinopathy in newborns and preemies after abrupt withdrawal of supplemental oxygen and in newborn animals subjected to hypoxic environments. Hypoxia is similarly present in chronic or non-healing wounds, but the difference is that the oxygen gradient is very shallow.  While no one has defined the exact slope of the shallow gradient, i.e. the distance over which oxygen reduction occurs in a non-healing wound, it is the usual underlying pathophysiology in most non-healing chronic wounds. Besides large vessel revascularization, to date only one therapy has been shown to consistently correct the shallow oxygen gradient and induce angiogenesis: HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY. 

The best model so far developed to study shallow perfusion gradient wounds and the one in which HBOT's angiogenesis effects have been unequivocally demonstrated is irradiated tissue. External beam radiation causes a well-defined stereotypic delayed thrombosis of small blood vessels that is maximal at the center of the beam and tapers at the edges. Marx (1) exploited this wound in animals and humans to show that HBOT caused a progressive angiogenesis at the wound margin by generating a steep oxygen gradient with intermittent repetitive HBOT. Over a course of about 30 treatments new vessel growth infiltrated the wound and achieved pO₂'s of about 85% of control tissue. Similar HBOT angiogenesis has been achieved in animals by Manson (2), Rohr (3), Meltzer (4), Nemiroff (5), Zhao (6), and others. This is the underlying basis of all HBOT in chronic wounding and accounts for the ability to heal diabetic foot wounds, arterial insufficiency ulcers, traumatic ischemic wounds, bums, and other devascularized wounds, providing major arterial supply is not severely decreased. On reverse side is an example of HBOT's angiogenesis capability.

HBOT treatment for patients with Alcoholism, Drug Addiction, and Narcotic Addiction in Post-Intoxication & Abstinence Period

Hyperbaric Oxygenation in the Treatment of Patients with
Drug Addiction, Narcotic Addiction and Alcoholism
 in the Post-Intoxication and Abstinence Periods

 
[Original Article in Russian]
Epifanova NM.

H.R. 396: The Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Act Has Been Added to the House Armed Services Bill

H.R. 396: The Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Act Has Been Added to the House Armed Services Bill

 
 
 
On May 25, 2011, at 7:22 PM, William Duncan wrote:
 
Ok. Now that H.R. 396: The Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Act has been added to the House Armed Services bill today by Congressman Sessions I have had several people ask me what that means and what the process is. Keep in mind it has typically taken 3 years to pass legislation in my other legislative projects. Persistence is key. This is year 3.
 

Tommy Tarlton Races for a Cause to Benefit Wounded Warriors

 

Please view John Salcedo's movie Brain Storm "Thunder Bowl" at  RealShowInt.Com

Join the Cause this Spring 2011

VTX Wounded Worrier Bike Run

28 MAY 2011: MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

 
 California VTX Riders Honor a Wounded Warrior at the 8th Annual Wounded Warrior Run

Please join us on this day as we honor this years Wounded Warrior. Our event is a fundraiser and 100% of funds collected will be donated to our Warrior. Join us for lunch, drinks, live music and dancing, visiting with old friends and making new ones. It's for the Warrior so please join us.

Our day starts at Loma Linda VA Hospital in Riverside, CA to have breakfast with our Veterans. Then we move to the junction of Hwy 138 and Interstate 15 to line up for the ride up the hill at 10:00am, we will stop at Silverwood lake to take a group picture then on to the BBQ!!

There will be T-shirts for sale and well some very good food! All proceeds are donated to our Wounded Warrior. You do not need a motorcycle to join us, and this is a family event!! See you there!!

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